Difference between revisions of "Mode of Operations"

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<big>When a [[CI]] moves from a normal [[Mode of Operations|Mode of Operation]], it is likely that its set of [[CI]] [[Dependency|dependencies]] largely shifts. For instance, under '''normal mode''' of operations, ordering diesel oil for a backup generator is given no thought at all. In case of a power failure, a likely cause is a [[Common cause failure]] where roads are blocked and transport of diesel oil becomes problematic. Moreover, one cannot call the company, the company has no power to fill the tank of the truck and no driver is available. Moving from such a '''stressed mode''' of operation where the backup generator still works, to a '''crisis mode''' situation causes another shift in dependencies. In the '''recovery mode''' of operations, one may critically be depending on roads, heavy lift equipment or air lift, and food. <ref>Nieuwenhuijs, A.H., Luiijf, H.A.M., Klaver M.H.A., “Modeling Critical Infrastructure Dependencies”, in: IFIP International Federation for Information Processing, Volume 290, Critical Infrastructure Protection II, eds. P. Mauricio and S. Shenoi, (Boston: Springer), October 2008, pp. 205-214, ISBN 978-0-387-88522-3</ref></big>
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<big>When a [[CI]] moves from a normal [[Mode of Operations|Mode of Operation]], it is likely that its set of [[CI]] [[Dependency|dependencies]] largely shifts. For instance, under '''normal mode''' of operations, ordering diesel oil for a backup generator is given no thought at all. In case of a power failure, a likely cause is a [[Common Cause Failure]] where roads are blocked and transport of diesel oil becomes problematic. Moreover, one cannot call the company, the company has no power to fill the tank of the truck and no driver is available. Moving from such a '''stressed mode''' of operation where the backup generator still works, to a '''crisis mode''' situation causes another shift in dependencies. In the '''recovery mode''' of operations, one may critically be depending on roads, heavy lift equipment or air lift, and food. <ref>Nieuwenhuijs, A.H., Luiijf, H.A.M., Klaver M.H.A., “Modeling Critical Infrastructure Dependencies”, in: IFIP International Federation for Information Processing, Volume 290, Critical Infrastructure Protection II, eds. P. Mauricio and S. Shenoi, (Boston: Springer), October 2008, pp. 205-214, ISBN 978-0-387-88522-3</ref></big>
  
 
==Definitions==
 
==Definitions==
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* Test reference. -->
  
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[[Category:Crisis]]
 
[[Category:Risk]]
 
[[Category:Risk]]
 
[[Category:Threat]]
 
[[Category:Threat]]
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Latest revision as of 00:56, 29 June 2019

When a CI moves from a normal Mode of Operation, it is likely that its set of CI dependencies largely shifts. For instance, under normal mode of operations, ordering diesel oil for a backup generator is given no thought at all. In case of a power failure, a likely cause is a Common Cause Failure where roads are blocked and transport of diesel oil becomes problematic. Moreover, one cannot call the company, the company has no power to fill the tank of the truck and no driver is available. Moving from such a stressed mode of operation where the backup generator still works, to a crisis mode situation causes another shift in dependencies. In the recovery mode of operations, one may critically be depending on roads, heavy lift equipment or air lift, and food. [1]

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  1. Nieuwenhuijs, A.H., Luiijf, H.A.M., Klaver M.H.A., “Modeling Critical Infrastructure Dependencies”, in: IFIP International Federation for Information Processing, Volume 290, Critical Infrastructure Protection II, eds. P. Mauricio and S. Shenoi, (Boston: Springer), October 2008, pp. 205-214, ISBN 978-0-387-88522-3